A new electorate. A new president. This altered homepage from the influential US music site Pitchfork pretty much summed up (for me) the way in which Obama has attracted massive support from young and (arguably) often apathetic Americans.  

It’s nice to think that thousands of musos who usually spend their time discussing the fact that no band will ever be as good as Pavement, or deconstructing the latest rhymes from crack-rap stalwarts Clipse, have felt compelled to come and and vote in droves.

/Tom

A new electorate. A new president. This altered homepage from the influential US music site Pitchfork pretty much summed up (for me) the way in which Obama has attracted massive support from young and (arguably) often apathetic Americans.

It’s nice to think that thousands of musos who usually spend their time discussing the fact that no band will ever be as good as Pavement, or deconstructing the latest rhymes from crack-rap stalwarts Clipse, have felt compelled to come and and vote in droves.

/Tom

Great initiative by 7-11 in the States - 7-Election lets shoppers choose whether they want a McCain or Obama cup. The results are then logged online - a superb idea.

/Tom

Great initiative by 7-11 in the States - 7-Election lets shoppers choose whether they want a McCain or Obama cup. The results are then logged online - a superb idea.

/Tom

Excellent piece in Prospect magazine about the huge importance of political blogging in the US election battle. Thanks to Adrian for the tip-off.

/Tom

Hype Machine has an interesting (and funny) way of getting its users to put up a profile picture: if you don’t, then you’re John McCain by default.

I think it will be highly effective.

/Tom

Hype Machine has an interesting (and funny) way of getting its users to put up a profile picture: if you don’t, then you’re John McCain by default.

I think it will be highly effective.

/Tom

ideas:

Examining the candidates | The Economist



Some (perhaps more salient) information from the Economist…

ideas:

Examining the candidates | The Economist
Some (perhaps more salient) information from the Economist…
Enough said, really. 

Thanks to Frank and Adrian for this one…

/Tom

Enough said, really.

Thanks to Frank and Adrian for this one…

/Tom

Scientists with too much time one their hands try and deduce exactly why and how their tearoom loses teaspoons at such a rate. 

Their conclusions?

"The high level of dissatisfaction with teaspoon coverage identified in our follow-up survey shows that teaspoons are an essential part of office life. Simultaneously, the rapid rate of teaspoon loss shows that their availability (and therefore office life) is under constant assault. 
Teaspoon displacement and loss leads to the use of forks, knives, and staplers to measure out coffee and sugar, inevitably causing a reduction in employee satisfaction; in addition, large amounts of time may be wasted searching for teaspoons, both factors leading to decreased employee efficiency. 
The cost of maintaining a workable teaspoon population, estimated at nearly $A100 (£43; $75; 63) a year for the study setting alone, must also be considered. We recommend that new institutes design their facilities so that programme linked tearooms predominate over communal tearooms and that existing institutes consider renovations to reduce the risk of teaspoon loss. 
We also advise that buying teaspoons of higher quality has no economic benefit. Finally, we suggest that the development of effective control measures against the loss of teaspoons should be a priority on national research agendas.”

Well that’s that sorted then …

Scientists with too much time one their hands try and deduce exactly why and how their tearoom loses teaspoons at such a rate.

Their conclusions?

"The high level of dissatisfaction with teaspoon coverage identified in our follow-up survey shows that teaspoons are an essential part of office life. Simultaneously, the rapid rate of teaspoon loss shows that their availability (and therefore office life) is under constant assault.
Teaspoon displacement and loss leads to the use of forks, knives, and staplers to measure out coffee and sugar, inevitably causing a reduction in employee satisfaction; in addition, large amounts of time may be wasted searching for teaspoons, both factors leading to decreased employee efficiency.
The cost of maintaining a workable teaspoon population, estimated at nearly $A100 (£43; $75; 63) a year for the study setting alone, must also be considered. We recommend that new institutes design their facilities so that programme linked tearooms predominate over communal tearooms and that existing institutes consider renovations to reduce the risk of teaspoon loss.
We also advise that buying teaspoons of higher quality has no economic benefit. Finally, we suggest that the development of effective control measures against the loss of teaspoons should be a priority on national research agendas.”

Well that’s that sorted then …

Strange similarity between the front and back covers of Nature here. Via the always amusing b3ta.

/Tom

Strange similarity between the front and back covers of Nature here. Via the always amusing b3ta.

/Tom

Glossy new site for Agent Provocateur./Tom

Glossy new site for Agent Provocateur.
/Tom

Samsung are up to some really interesting digital stuff at the moment - Tim showed me this new video for their Omnia phone, which cleverly plays upon the massive YouTube phenomenon of unboxing.

The company’s recent work for the Instinct phone surpasses this though - a truly interactive YouTube video story, with amusing and provocative content. Have a go here.

And check out the main Instinct site, which offers cash to people who post the most flagrant product placement videos of the phone on YouTube - a great, witty idea.

/Tom

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